Urology Specialists of Milford, LLC Blog

Posts for tag: Men's Health

As they age, men run the very common risk of having an enlarged prostate, also known as Benign Prostate Hyperplasia or BPH. While most men will experience some sort of prostate issue during his life, the good news is that an enlarged prostate does not always indicate a more serious condition such as cancer. However, an enlarged prostate does bring with it its own set of inconveniences and problems. If you are experiencing any of the following signs, changes are you may have an enlarged prostate and should seek treatment as soon as you can before matters become worse.

Nocturia: midnight bathroom runs.

It starts innocently enough, with a few midnight trips to the bathroom. But over time, the trips become more frequent, making long car rides or meetings at work difficult to bear without removing oneself to void.

Difficulty urinating.

When the prostate gland, which surrounds the urethra, enlarges, it can shut off the ability to urinate, making urination difficult and sometimes painful. Urinary hesitancy occurs when the stream starts slowly until it becomes consistent. At times, there is a sensation of wanting to urinate, but with moot results. Weak flow is also a symptom of an enlarged prostate.

Frequent urinary tract infections.

When the bladder doesn’t fully void, there runs a risk of developing chronic urinary tract infections. While more common in women, UTIs are do occur in men with enlarged prostate; that’s because bacteria can build up over time if it is not carried away through urination. Any sort of burning sensation, chills, or cloudy urine may be signs of a urinary tract infection and, thus, an enlarged prostate.

Blood in Urine

An enlarged prostate may also present as blood in the urine; this may mean that there are other complications involved, such as an infection or possibly cancer.

Treatment

Treating BPH depends on the extent of one’s symptoms, the size of the prostate, the age of the patient and the amount of discomfort caused by the prostate’s enlargement. After confirming your condition with a series of tests, your urologist may choose a more conservative measure of treatment, such as medication; or surgical treatment if your symptoms are more advanced

Your Urologist in Milford

If you have any of the above symptoms of an enlarged prostate or are experiencing any other urological concerns, contact the Urology Specialists of Milford by calling (508) 473-6333, or request an appointment online. Don’t suffer in silence, an enlarged prostate is extremely common and fairly simple to treat, as long as you are willing to get checked. Trust your prostate health to the best – call us today.

The symptoms of an enlarged prostate can become a problem for men as they age. You may have been the kind of person who never suffered from an overactive bladder when, all of a sudden, it seems like you are waking up to use the restroom every night. This increased frequency of nighttime urination (nocturia) can be one of the first signs of an enlarged prostate.

Nearly 50 percent of all men suffer from an enlarged prostate by the age of 60, according to the American Urological Association.

The telltale signs of an enlarged prostate, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), include having difficulty emptying your bladder, having to urinate frequently or feeling like you need to urinate and not being able to. Symptoms like these, unfortunately, can start slowly before they begin to affect your daily life. Most men experience symptoms when the enlarged prostate blocks the free flow of urine from your bladder through your urethra. 

Not only is an enlarged prostate uncomfortable, but it can also be painful, frustrating, and put you at risk for other health issues. If you aren’t able to fully empty your bladder, you have a higher risk of developing a urinary tract infection (UTI), bladder stones, or having blood in the urine. 

Although an enlarged prostate may seem like an embarrassing problem, it’s actually incredibly common. Thankfully, there are plenty of remedies that can help relieve the symptoms of an enlarged prostate, including: 

Alpha Blockers

While alpha blocker medications do not actually reduce the size of an enlarged prostate, they do help to relax your muscles. So, while your prostate may still be causing a urinary tract blockage, relaxed muscles around the bladder allows you to urinate more easily without pain, strain, or frustration.

Noninvasive Therapy

Transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT), is a type of treatment that uses a microwave of sorts to heat and destroy prostate tissue that is blocking urine flow. Considered a minimally invasive treatment, TUMT involves inserting a narrow antenna through the penis tip to the location of the urethra blockage. This type of treatment can help reduce urinary frequency and urgency, and make it easier for you to empty your bladder. 

Surgical Procedures 

There are plenty of options to relieve the symptoms of an enlarged prostate if you are open to a more invasive approach. 

Your doctor can insert a stent, or small metal coil, in your urethra in order to widen it and keep it open. This is usually performed as an outpatient procedure.

A transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) involves making one or two small incisions to open the urinary channel.

One of the most common types of surgery for an enlarged prostate is a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), which surgically removes the overgrown prostate tissue. 

Prostate laser surgery uses concentrated light energy to destroy prostate tissue. The advantages of this type of laser surgery include less bleeding, a less invasive procedure and faster recovery. 

To learn more about benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), contact the Urology Specialists of Milford. Dr. Jeffrey Steinberg, a board-certified and highly experienced urologist, specializes in urological disorders, especially prostate enlargement and its symptoms. To schedule your consultation, call us at (508) 473-6333 or use our convenient appointment request form.

About five percent of men who are 40 years of age have complete erectile dysfunction (ED); that number increases to 15 percent for 70-year-olds. Erectile dysfunction is the inability to get and keep an erection that is firm enough for sex.

ED can be triggered by stress, a reduction in sexual desire, or an underlying health issue. One’s ability to get and maintain an erection requires the proper functioning of psychologic, neurologic, endocrine, vascular, and local anatomic systems combined. 

For this reason, diagnosing the condition typically involves a variety of testing. Let’s explore how this is done.

Testing for ED

Your clinician will first ask a series of questions. It’s best to keep track of when your symptoms started and how long they’ve been a problem, because these answers will be important in this phase of diagnosis.

There are many risk factors associated with ED, from medical conditions such as high blood pressure to psychological conditions such as stress, depression, or anxiety. The list of possible triggers is boundless, so your physician will begin with an evaluation of your medical history.

Your doctor may also ask you to fill out a questionnaire that answers how confident you are about keeping an erection, whether you have erections when you wake up in the morning, how often you find sexual intercourse satisfying, and how often you’re able to climax, orgasm, and ejaculate.

While these topics may feel taboo to discuss, doing so can make all the difference in solving your erectile issues. Remember that a urologist diagnoses and treats health issues like these every day, so there is no reason to be embarrassed.

Examination Techniques for Erectile Dysfunction 

Your urologist will conduct a physical exam of the testes and penis – which will test for sensation and other issues. This exam will also confirm whether there may be an issue with the nerve endings in these areas.

Your doctor may direct you to have lab work done if you haven’t already done so. Both urinalysis and blood draws will help to diagnose many different health conditions, and they will also indicate whether heart disease, diabetes, or low testosterone levels are to blame for your ED.

Radiology imaging is integral to the field of medicine and to diagnosing of health issues. Ultrasound – which is a commonly known type of radiology due to its role in pregnancy – is beneficial for detecting poor blood flow in the genital area, as well as recording the speed and direction of blood flow.

Psychological Causes for ED

There is sometimes a psychological factor involved in health conditions such as ED, so a mental health evaluation may be a necessary part of your diagnosis. NYU Langone Health estimates that approximately 10 percent of ED cases have a psychological component; ED due to psychological reasons tends to be more common in younger men. 

If you’re experiencing extreme stress at work, or you have a history of depression, it may be impacting you sexually. The most common mental triggers for erectile dysfunction are fear of sexual failure, depression, and stress. 

Who Can Help Treat My ED?

Seeking the medical advice of a reputable and trustworthy urologist can help you get back to feeling like yourself again. Led by board-certified urologist Dr. Jeffrey Steinberg, Urology Specialists of Milford diagnoses and treats a variety of men’s health issues – including low testosterone, male infertility, and ED. 

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call us today at (508) 473-6333or fill out our appointment request form here. We look forward to helping you achieve optimal health and wellness so you can enjoy life to the fullest.